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Category Archive for 'Laughter'

from Med Hypotheses. 2006;67(3):566-71. Jerath R, Edry JW, Barnes VA, Jerath V. Augusta Women’s Center, 2100 Central Avenue, Suite 6 & 7, Augusta, GA 30904, USA. RJ605R@aol.com Pranayamic breathing, defined as a manipulation of breath movement, has been shown to contribute to a physiologic response characterized by the presence of decreased oxygen consumption, decreased heart […]

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from J Cancer Educ. 2006 Spring;21(1):30-4 Borod M. Division of Palliative Care, Montreal General Hospital, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3G 1A4. manuel.borod@muhc.mcgill.ca Humor and laughter have been thought to be beneficial for thousands of years. Although much has been written on this subject, there is very little written about the actual use […]

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from J Prim Prev. 2007 Mar;28(2):167-82 Beckman H, Regier N, Young J. Health Psychology Department, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI 53792-2424, USA. ht.beckman@hosp.wisc.edu This study measured the impact of a purposeful aerobic laughter intervention on employees’ sense of self-efficacy in the workplace. Participants were 33 employees of a behavioral health center. They […]

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from Care Manag J. 2008;9(1):19-24 McMahan SC. selenamcmahan@gmail.com Over the past 30 years, there has been aplentitude of research into the health benefits of humor and laughter for healthy, sick, or depressed adults and children as well as for senior citizens. Medical research supports our human instinct that people who smile and laugh are happy, […]

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from Clin J Oncol Nurs. 2005 Apr;9(2):211-8 Christie W, Moore C. gchristie@centurytel.net Using the Stetler model, in-depth literature reviews were performed that demonstrated a positive correlation between humor and comfort levels in patients with cancer. Humor frequently was used for relaxation and as a coping mechanism that aided in promoting general wellness. The literature indicated […]

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from Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2009 Jun;6(2):271-6 Stuber M, Hilber SD, Mintzer LL, Castaneda M, Glover D, Zeltzer L. Semel Institute at UCLA, 760 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1759. mstuber@mednet.ucla.edu. Although there are many clinical programs designed to bring humor into pediatric hospitals, there has been very little research with children or adolescents […]

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from J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2004 Mar;42(3):18-25 MacDonald CM. Nursing Services, Naval Medical Center San Diego, California 92134-1005, USA. cmmacdonald@nmcsd.med.navy.mil There are several beneficial efforts attributed to humor and laughter, including improved immune function, increased pain tolerance, and decreased stress response. Humor therapy, laughter therapy, laughter meditation,and laughter clubs all have unique implications […]

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from Aust Fam Physician. 2001 Jan;30(1):25-8 Hassed C. Department of Community Medicine and General Practice, Monash University, Victoria. BACKGROUND: The beneficial effect of humour on health has long been recognised anecdotally and intuitively but studying and quantifying that effect is difficult. ‘Studying humour is like dissecting a frog–you may know a lot but you end […]

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from Psychol Bull. 2001 Jul;127(4):504-19 Martin RA. Department of Psychology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C2, Canada. ramartin@uwo.ca All published research examining effects of humor and laughter on physical health is reviewed. Potential causal mechanisms and methodological issues are discussed. Laboratory experiments have shown some effects of exposure to comedy on several components […]

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from Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2006 Jun;3(2):187-90 Bennett MP, Lengacher C. Our results support a connection between sense of humor and self-reported physical health, however, it is difficult to determine the relationship to any specific disease process. Whereas relationships between sense of humor and self-reported measures of physical well-being appear to be supported, more […]

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