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Category Archive for 'for nurses'

At the Bahia Resort: 998 W. Mission Bay Drive, San Diego, CA 92109 With Sogyal Rinpoche Author of the highly-acclaimed The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying Understanding the Mind: the Key to Peace & Happiness – A Public Talk November 26 at 7pm | Admission $20, Students $10 The Secret of Meditation & How […]

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AACN Advanced Critical Care Volume 20, Number 1, pp.108–111 Cynda Hylton Rushton, RN, PhD, FAAN Do you ever notice how difficult it becomes when you are embroiled in an ethical conflict to stop long enough to reflect on your own motivations, much less the motivations of others? Or how easily we begin to create our […]

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from Prim Care. 2010 Mar;37(1):81-90 Fortney L, Taylor M. Department of Family Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA. Luke.Fortney@fammed.wisc.edu Meditation practice in the medical setting is proving to be an excellent adjunctive therapy for many illnesses and an essential and primary means of maintaining holistic health and wellness. Rather than being a fringe or […]

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from Clin J Oncol Nurs. 2005 Apr;9(2):211-8 Christie W, Moore C. gchristie@centurytel.net Using the Stetler model, in-depth literature reviews were performed that demonstrated a positive correlation between humor and comfort levels in patients with cancer. Humor frequently was used for relaxation and as a coping mechanism that aided in promoting general wellness. The literature indicated […]

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from the journal, Int J Nurs Pract. 2009 Jun;15(3):145-55 Williams AM, Davies A, Griffiths G. The Western Australian Centre for Cancer and Palliative Care, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. anne.m.williams@health.wa.gov.au Nurses often use non-pharmacological measures to facilitate comfort for patients within the hospital setting. However, guidelines for use of these measures are […]

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from the J Nurs Adm. 2009 Mar;39(3):130-7. Pipe TB, Bortz JJ, Dueck A, Pendergast D, Buchda V, Summers J. Department of Psychiatry/Psychology, Section of Biostatistics, Division of Nursing, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Mayo Clinic Hospital, 5777 E Mayo Blvd., Phoenix, AZ 85054, USA. pipe.teri@mayo.edu OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to rigorously evaluate a brief […]

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In the most recent Archives of Internal Medicine, investigators examined the pervasive but poorly understood issue of “the difficult patient encounter” (Arch Intern Med. 2009;169(4):410-414).  The authors write “Nearly 1 of 6 outpatient visits is considered difficult by physicians. Difficult encounters are more likely to occur with patients who have a mental disorder, present with […]

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 J Holist Nurs. 2007 Dec;25(4):228-35; discussion 236-7 Ross R, Sawatphanit W, Suwansujarid T. Kent State University, USA. PURPOSE: This study examines the Buddhist beliefs and practices of Thai HIV-positive postpartum women as ways to live with their infection. METHOD: Seven HIV-positive postpartum, Buddhist, Thai women were interviewed. Principles of hermeneutic phenomenology guided the study. FINDINGS: […]

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by Anne Bruce   RN PhD The perception of time shifts as patients enter hospice care. As a complex, socially determined construct, time plays a significant role in end-of-life care. Drawing on Buddhist and Western perspectives, conceptualizations of linear and cyclical time are discussed alongside notions of time as interplay of embodied experience and concept. […]

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Western thought has dominated scientific development for a long time, and nursing has not escaped the influence of such ideology. Nurse scholars, in an attempt to fit the dominant scientific ideology, typically have had to struggle with non-empirical elements of nursing. This orientation in science, however, may have contributed inadvertently to a form of scientific […]

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